The Latest

If you are 35 or younger - and quite often, older - the advice of the old economy does not apply to you. You live in the post-employment economy, where corporations have decided not to pay people. Profits are still high. The money is still there. But not for you. You will work without a raise, benefits, or job security. Survival is now a laudable aspiration.

Quoted from Sarah Kendzior’s “Surviving the Post-Employment Economy

“In the United States, nine percent of computer science majors are unemployed, and 14.7 percent of those who hold degrees in information systems have no job. Graduates with degrees in STEM - science, technology, engineering and medicine - are facing record joblessness, with unemployment at more than twice pre-recession levels. The job market for law degree holders continues to erode, with only 55 percent of 2011 law graduates in full-time jobs. Even in the military, that behemoth of the national budget, positions are being eliminated or becoming contingent due to the sequester.

It is not skills or majors that are being devalued. It is people.”

Her work is frank, speaking of a reality I hope that will never be mine. At the same time, it gives me a strange comfort to know that I am not alone.

(via sextus—empiricus)

I will always reblog this quote.  Hits way too close to home for me.

(via missbananafish)

The most salient part of this, to me, is the underscoring of the fact that there is no “right” college major where you’re guaranteed a job forever. Conservatives love to pretend college graduates working minimum-wage or freelance jobs just didn’t “pick the right major” - those foolish fools studied the arts or literature or something else frivolous, so they deserve crushing debt and no job security! No. There is no magical college major that will let you sidestep the jobless recovery.

(via teh-den)

(via mswyrr)

Apr 17, 2014 / 20,638 notes
gregorygalloway:

Jack Johnson (March 31, 1878 – June 10, 1946)
Apr 14, 2014 / 149 notes

gregorygalloway:

Jack Johnson (March 31, 1878 – June 10, 1946)

(via cre8tivesilence)

Apr 14, 2014 / 200,345 notes
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mymodernmet:

Lifestyle photographer Grace Chon recently turned the camera on her 10-month-old baby Jasper and their 7-year-old rescue dog Zoey, putting them side-by-side in the some of the most adorable portraits ever.

(via mswyrr)

disciplesofmalcolm:

Left to right: Angela Davis, Kwame Ture (Stokely Carmichael), and Barbara Easley (Emory Douglas’s sister) at LAX, Los Angeles, California.
Taken from “Black Panthers: 1968” by Howard L. Bingham
Apr 12, 2014 / 3,180 notes

disciplesofmalcolm:

Left to right: Angela Davis, Kwame Ture (Stokely Carmichael), and Barbara Easley (Emory Douglas’s sister) at LAX, Los Angeles, California.

Taken from “Black Panthers: 1968” by Howard L. Bingham

(via posttragicmulatto)

djgreypussy:

do-not-touch-my-food:

Chocolate Chip Caramel Stuffed Cookies

SHAKES SCREAMS AND CRIES
Apr 9, 2014 / 11,373 notes
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(via bettychantel)

I thought it was Velvet.
Apr 8, 2014 / 3,236 notes

I thought it was Velvet.

Apr 8, 2014 / 371 notes

cultureunseen:

Just ten of the thirty-five films by Shelton Jackson "Spike" Lee

1.   She’s Gotta Have It
2.   School Daze
3.   Do The Right Thing
4.   Mo’ Betta Blues
5.   Jungle Fever
6.   Malcolm X
7.   Crooklyn
8.   Clockers
9.   He Got Game
10. Bamboozled

(via posttragicmulatto)

Apr 8, 2014 / 10,464 notes

Suzy: Mile 3.25 Tidal Inlet. It’s got no ring to it

Sam: Let’s change it. What should it be?

Suzy: Let me think for a minute

(via swiftscinema)

Apr 8, 2014 / 13,423 notes

Saoirse Ronan as Agatha in The Grand Budapest Hotel (x)

(via swiftscinema)

There is something about poverty that smells like death. Dead dreams dropping off the heart like leaves in a dry season and rotting around the feet; impulses smothered too long in the fetid air of underground caves. The soul lives in a sickly air. People can be slave-ships in shoes.
Zora Neale Hurston, Dust Tracks on a Road: An Autobiography (New York:  HarperCollins, 1996), 87. (Originally published 1942)

(via 10stigwood)

Apr 8, 2014 / 1,968 notes
We usually know a lover is on the way well before he [or she] gets here. As often as we hear stories like “I met my partner when I least expected to meet anyone,” on some level, we know that’s nonsense. A woman in touch with herself can sense the coming of things, and the coming of love is like a deer running through a forest on the way to your door. We can feel love approaching, and when we are in touch with the Goddess, we prepare ourselves in advance.
Marianne Williamson (via mindofataurus)

Goddess.

(via myfirstfeaturefilm)

Apr 5, 2014 / 149 notes